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to the conservative rationale for budget can you tell us when conservatives get more honest about the debt and deficit. a conservative columnist says about the new ryan budget, it sacrificed seriousness for seriousness by promising to reach budgetary balance, not over the long term as budgets 1.0 and 2.0 did, but in a ten year window. this is not going to happen, and more importantly there's no reason why it needs to happen. modest deficits are perfectly compatible with fiscal responsibility. talk about singing a new tune. and the conservative think tank, the american enterprise institute asks why does the budget need to balance in ten years? debt reduction doesn't require balance, just that the economy is growing faster than the debt, while the plan does put the debt to gdp ratio on a downward trajectory, it probably doesn't need to be quite as steep. ezra klein, this is a big deal, and you're here on this show to prove it is a big deal. you would never come out this late if this wasn't a huge deal. >> absolutely not. >> this is huge. the debt is the reason we have to do all these terrible things to
the deficits, although george w. bush never balanced a budget in eight years but of course these were freedom deficits. of a the credit card with no limit presidency of mr. bush, the credit card bill has arrived in your mailbox. it's called austerity. last decade, we had two wars off the books while cutting taxes for the wealthy. there are ways to fix our deficit, but don't hurt the poor and middle class a carbon tax creating capital gains and income. apparently we don't really hate
, it is unexamined on some level. secondarily, if you say deficit reduction, the partisan are leeched out. we are talking about whether it will work to balance the budget. if along the way 35 million become uninsured, that's sad but we don't talk about it because cbo didn't mention it in the score. that's the great trick of paul ryan to recognize if you only talk about budget deficit, where does your budget put the deficit 20, 30 years from now, the amount of things you sneak in under that cloak that you can never put into the conversation in a serious way in normal times is tremendous. that's the central political innovation of his career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's
, taxes, spending and deficits. and the notion that they're going to somehow come together, there's really no, no, i guess, carrot for them to go after here. >> and then they go home for two weeks. >> sure. >> and the question is are they going to hear anything from their constituents that's going to move anybody. i don't know. >> i think that they're not. and the best chance that they had to potentially hear about it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipartisan group. we couple it with targeted cuts and reforms over a period of time. and if you actually look at the totality of the budget changes we made over the last couple of years, including the $1.5 trillion, we have a higher ratio of cuts to revenue. considering all the revenue than sim spso simpson-bowles did. a
, but ultimately if there's any chance at dealing with the debt and deficit, these two, very different philosophies and visions. >> early april, the president comes up with his budget recommendation. a lot of people are hoping all of this will eventually result in the grand bargain, a real deal looking down the road, everyone on board basically. a deal that would avoid, for example, having to worry about raising the debt ceiling end of july, early august. is that at all doable? >> it is possible. i wouldn't go as far as saying doable now. but what i will say, the difference in approach now versus say two years ago when they tried this and it failed and it was, you know, almost the end of the world as the u.s. bumped up against the debt ceiling, the difference is they are going through what we call in washington regular order. everything is done in the open. i think that has lead to a different atmosphere on capitol hill where people know what's going on, they're voting on measures, and they're not waiting to see the white smoke from the white house when the president and house speaker and others ar
the president a major deficit reduction victory or not? if they really believe that needs to be done and the president put something on the table that gets them significant entitlement reform and savings, i think they've got to do it. >> harold, i think the possibility of deals and immigration, possibility of deals on guns, possibility of deals on the budget, on the long-term debt, i think the possibilities are actually -- excuse me for being optimistic, pretty darn good on all fronts. you've got republicans who daily are holding press conferences wringing their hands trying to figure out how to save their party. and you have a president who, again, he's a 47%, pretty damn good considering everything. but still, he wants to be over 50% and he wants a legacy. he doesn't want to just talk about what he did the first two years. >> i agree. i believe the prospects for progress on both immigration and gun control are gun regulation. if we get progress on the budget and the debt. i think immigration and gun regulations are easier to win. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong,
they trust on spending issues. when asked how our budget deficit should be reduced, a large majority, 65% of people said by cutting spending. when asked to choose between the budgets proposed by each party, most people pick the one more in line with the republican proposal. cutting spending and not raising taxes. but when asked when each party was trusted more, people say that they trust the democrats more. go figure. let's get an amp explanation from charlie hearst, economists at the washington times. so you have this. people seem to like the republican approach. they just don't like the republican label with it. why is that? >> i think a large degree, republicans have been snakepit. largely because of what we have seen over the last couple of years. republicans talking to the media, which is something the democrats have focused on more than anything else. including the ideas that republicans have gone four. voters are far more in line with those ideas. but i would actually argue that republicans least realize that there is a problem here and there is a real disconnect between washingto
that passed through the senate really echos what president obama would like to see in terms of deficit reduction but the problem, of course, is when you match up is the senate bill with the house bill. the senate bill calls for deficit reduction through increasing taxes and spending cuts and, of course, the house bill calls for steep cuts in balancing the budget within ten years. of course, some revisions to medicare as well. a lot of differences and we have another deadline coming up. the debt ceiling will have to be revisited this summer, alex. >> looking forward to that. >> reporter: yeah, we all are. >> thank you very much, kristen welker. >>> joining me right now, andy sullivan and ann palmer. ann, i'll begin with you. the president is back from the middle east. the reviews are out there. how are you getting the word in terms of how he was perceived? >> i think one of the key things you can look at is what the israeli press put out in the days following his first steps and throughout the entire visit and it was a resounding applause. he got very good praise from them. obviously fr
you think the war is to blame for the deficits we see these days? >> no. it's really not. if you look at where defense spending is today either as a percentage of the economy or budget, it's below post-war norms. under the president's budget it will fall more rapidly. the main cause that we saw today of the explosive growth in spending over ten years, president obama made that worse although the republicans in congress ten years ago didn't cover themselves and the changing face of america. we have many more now supported by workers for the retirement programs and a noble important purpose. they need to be preserved for the next generation. >> you are a proud veteran and something i find to be interesting to some degree of polling is the lack of availability for benefits for those who have served so nobly and come home. i want to put up the stats for you. veterans affairs data. 600,000 veterans have benefits and 245,000 have benefitings back lock logged aier or more. the average is 273 days. the first time claimants from iraq and afghanistan, the average wait is 316 days. how come if y
the deficit, more stimulus and spending. we are in the funny process where we will wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. any issue you have heard your callers call in and complain --ut, we might see today drone strikes against u.s. citizens, taxes, repealing healthcare -- they might all come up, but it is adding to a nonbinding budget resolution, so it is interesting and it might give people clues. host: a headline in your sayscation, "the hill," the senate is poised to pass a budget. guest: i think democrats will control the process and get it passed. .hey have a small window they can afford five democrats to not vote for it and still pass it, and in that case you would need vice president joe biden to break the time. -- the thai. .- tie there is pent-up frustration on the republican side about no real budget debate over four years. once it is passed, a lot of people will feel better. democrats will say we passed a budget, republicans get to complain about the budget month but from there it is hard to see how the senate budget reconciles with the house bu
in than in any year in our history, yet we are still going to have a trillion dollar budget deficit. doesn't anyone realize there is a problem here? >> speaker boehner, i understand you met this morning with some of your members on benghazi, there's already been a report done. multiple hearings. are republicans planning further review? are you going to issue subpoenas? >> there were some members who wanted to a conversation to compare notes on what we know and don't know. and frankly there is a lot that we still don't know. so it was a friendly exchange of information and some decisions about a way forward. i any on what happened priorle to september 11, what actually happened on september 11. and then why it was described for weeks after something that it wasn't. when the people were watching this knew it was a terrorist attack. >> the c.r. passed today included some cushion for certain programs like border patrol, to help them get by with the sequester going into effect, but it did not do anything to prevent layoff that is are going to occur at t.s.a., f.a.a., traffic control towers are
.s. debt that has been accrued since 2001. aboutrse when we think debt and deficits, there are two kinds of deficit. there are those that invest in human capital or infrastructure or investing in education, and those which do not, which endanger our future by adding to the national debt. and this war deficit was of the second type. third point that i am passionate about, although it is difficult for many people to be passionate about accounting, but i am passionate about the lack of war accounting. one of the purposes of our book and the several book chapters that we have written since then is to argue that bad accounting matters. the u.s. owes nearly a trillion dollars in what business would call deferred compensation to the men and women who fought the war, but this liability does not appear anywhere on the national balance sheet. we did not account for the value iraqe 6658 lives lost in and afghanistan. that is just the troops, not civilians, not contractors, except for small amount of life insurance money. even though civilian government agencies estimate the value of life at $7.20 m
-term budget deficit and the house is poised to take up congressman paul ryan's budget tomorrow. joining me right now republican congresswoman marsha blackburn of tennessee. i want to start by showing everybody the new poll numbers. both sides have taken a hit when it comes to the budget hit. 67% disapprove of the way the president has dealt with the budget. 79% disapprove of the republicans on this. people at home think it's just absolutely ridiculous. will those numbers push both sides to find a compromise before it's too late, before the numbers continue to go down any further? >> you. thomas, i think you're right. they do want to see a resolution to this and what they're wanting to see a resolution to first is the out of control spending. get this out of control spending under control. and that's what we hear from both sides of the aisle, from our constituents, regardless of whether they're democrat, independent, republican, libertarian, you name it. they say, washington spends too much. you don't have a revenue problem. you have a spending problem. get it all under control. that is wha
the deficit, creates jobs, ensures global peace and security. t fights a good fight often without a lot of recognition but just doing a good job. not speaking today on behalf congressional black caucus. we have to hold any president ccountable in terms of checks and balances. that is part of the three ranches of government, udiciary, executive and legislati legislative. we have a duty and ensure that y to people have a voice in their guest: let government. what the house of representatives is about. written to president obama and respectfully have sked him to really justify and give us the information about the asis upon which -- legal basis -- the use of drones is engaged in as a result of efforts. we are waiting for the response from them on that. think it is important we ask any president questions as members of congress, it is our responsibility to do that and to personally continue to do that. i think that it president has image changed america's and role in the world and is phenomenal job. but that doesn't mean i won't exercise my duties and rights as ask the of congress to hard q
revenue in than any year in our history, and yet we will still have a trillion- dollar budget deficit. does not anybody realize there is a problem here? >> i understand you met with some of your senators and members on the issue of benghazi. [indiscernible] republicans planning further review? are you planning more subpoenas? >> there are members who wanted to compare notes on what we know and what we do not know. frankly there is a lot we still do not know. it was a friendly exchange of information, and some decisions about a way forward. [indiscernible] on what happened prior to september 11, what actually happened on september 11, and then why it was described for weeks as some think it was not, when the people who were watching this knew it was a terrorist attack. . included cushions for programs like border control to help them get by this question, but it does not do anything to prevent layoffs for traffic controllers per couldn't congress have done more for leaving -- before leaving on its recap -- on its recess the prevent these layoffs? but listen, under this bill, some agenc
the rate. we say, let's take some of that revenue to help reduce the deficit, combined with other targeted cuts. >> be more specific for me. when you talk about tax loopholes and the very wealthy. which specific loopholes and what is very wealthy? >> sure, sure, these are, when you're in the highest tax bracket, you're in the 39% tax bracket when you get a deduction, whatever it may be for, you get 39 cents worth of deduction. whereas somebody who is in the 28% tax bracket only gets 28 cents deduction for that particular deduction. so what we're saying and this is similar to a proposal the president's put forward, is that for folks who are in that very high bracket, the 39% bracket, the value of your deductions will be limited to about 28% which is what the value of deductions is for a middle income taxpayer. >> so ultimately, the budget that you have there and i just read the little chunk of it, you have more revenue increases than cuts, right? >> within, within this particular budget, but if you look, soledad, at the two-year period of reduction we've been engaged in, which is -- include
is it doesn't really look like a whole lot. surely not enough to fill our deficit at this point but it is going to bring back the cooler temperatures in the overnight hours with the cloud cover. we will actually see our 0 overnight lows and our morning temperatures come up. low 40s in the forecast tuesday, wednesday, thursday. unsettled weather wednesday and thursday with a bigger storm moving in for the weekend. this second system, or third system i guess we could call it, could bring us scattered showers for saturday and sunday. >>> on tuesday night the sacramento city counsel will consider throwing up a last- second shot to keep the kings from leaving town. the city has struck a daily to build a new $448 million downtown arena, and it would be the largest redevelopment project in sacramento history with up to a million and a half square feet of offices housing shops and a hotel. the city would pay $258 million with most of the money coming from the sale of bonds supported by parking revenues. >> that's part of revitalizing our downtown. that's part of completing the rest of k
spending but leaves the government with $566 billion in annual deficits over the next ten years. the house plan balances the budget by 2023 with big cuts in domestic spending and major changes to medicare and the tax code. charlie rangel, new york's most famous congressman, is here with me. former chair of the house ways and means committee. start with the chasm between the two plans. is there room for compromise at all between the senate and house plan? >> the major difference is that, obama and most of the country that voted for him really thinks that a time of recession that we're coming out of it that we should be creating jobs and not laying off people just with cuts. that is the difference. the major difference between the senate and the house. republicans say no taxes, no money, no investment. well, that's absolutely ridiculous. in order to get people back to work and having disposable income, you've got to invest in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
to close the 54 schools in an effort to make a dent in a $1 billion budget deficit, make better use of resources and improve overall education here in the nation's third largest school district. >> i don't think it's going to be good for my kids. >> reporter: the news of the school closings continues to ripple across chicago this morning. >> i'm, just don't know where they're going to go. >> reporter: mayor rahm emmanuel says the closures are necessary after too much money was being spent on maintaining underutilized school buildings saying "by consolidating these schools, chicago public schools can focus on safely getting every child into a better performing school. like school systems in new york and philadelphia, where schools are being closed, chicago must make tough choices." a number of teachers may lose their jobs as a result of the closings. karen lewis. of the teachers' union lashed out at emmanuel. >> our mayor, who is away on a ski trip, drops this information right before spring break. it's the ultimate bullying job. mayor rahm emmanuel should be ashamed of himself. >> r
of a communication ability to translate that is a significant deficit. for highly uncommon events such as an asteroid fly-by, there's simply no established communication mechanism. i believe our flight operations team learned of da-14 when they received a courtesy call from a colleague at the aerospace corporation. last year the commercial satellite industry participated in dod's war games designed to exercise dod thinking about the deployment of its terrestrial and space assets in response to a conflict situation. last year those games concluded, as they have several times in the past, that dod relies on commercial satellite companies -- their reliance is considerable and that a crisis is the wrong time to try to establish clear lines of communication with your major partners and suppliers. i suspect the same conclusion can be safely applied to the topics that we're discussing today. while governments were first to send satellites to near-earth space, commercial enterprise will be the primary use of the orbital arc in the 21st century. government and space operators need to take a more collaborative
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)